Sloan MBA Careers Breakdown

Sloan has one of the smallest MBA classes. ~30% go into consulting. Low single digits even go into investment management and private equity. I was curious to see what firms hired Sloan MBA students:

Sloan Employer Type
Advent International Corp. Private Equity
Black River Asset Management Asset Management
Fidelity Investments Asset Management
MassVentures Venture Capital
MFS Investment Management Asset Management
Norwest Equity Partners Venture Capital
PAR Capital Management Hedge Fund
Passport Capital Hedge Fund
PIMCO Asset Management
Redstar Ventures Venture Capital
Wellington Management Asset Management

Forgive me if I left off some names on accident. This list includes both 2014 full-time and 2015 internships. The list is ALOT smaller than Kellogg’s. One thing I was impressed with was Sloan’s faculty in Finance. However, if I did get accepted at Sloan, I will be taking a real hard look at pursuing entrepreneurship. Potentially having finance as a fall-back.

The buy-side presence is really small here at Sloan.

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My Ranking of Schools and Details about Kellogg Interview

My three goals of business school: entrepreneurship, network, and professor mentor. I want to build something. I want to meet new people and create life-long friendships. I want to work closely with a professor on a finance research project and have him to fall-back on when I have theoretical questions while on-the-job (I am always intellectually curious and question every investment made).

I will be happy to get accepted to any of the business schools on my list. But right now at this moment, I would rank my choices: Sloan, Wharton, Booth, and Kellogg. In reality, these 4 schools interchange ranking everyday as I do more diligence. Sloan has the best entrepreneurship track and small class to get to know professors. Great alumni network. Wharton has the best finance program and has the Wharton West campus. Booth is strong in both finance and entrepreneurship with the New Venture Challenge. Kellogg has unique programs like the AMP (Asset Management Practicum) that caught my eye, and the culture at Kellogg I definitely identify with the most. Furthermore, I could finally have a team to truly root for in college sports.

Now the purpose of this post is to focus on my thoughts on Kellogg. I interviewed in November. Kellogg interviews everyone in the USA I believe, and they use a mix of first-year, second-year, alumni, and admission officer. So I flew in for the interview in the morning. I showed up actually 45 minutes early! However… I did not call the admissions office to ask about parking guidance, since this is Evanston, Illinois! It should have parking everywhere! Lo’ and behold, I parked at the wrong spot. Recommendation: call ahead of time to ask about parking.

I was not impressed with Kellogg’s building, but I do appreciate having a campus and living close to campus. My interviewer asked standard questions:

  1. Tell me about yourself.
  2. Why Kellogg?
  3. Why MBA?
  4. What kind of leader are you?
  5. Describe yourself in 2-3 words.
  6. What do your friends think about you?

There were a few other questions I may have left out. I did not prepare the “what kind of leader am I” question, since I really lead in various ways based on various circumstances. On a side note, Kellogg has the most impressive online presence. You can sign up in their portal to list your background, and they will automatically connect with you a student of a similar background. I learned a lot about the finance and AMP program. The AMP program could definitely be the kicker if I get accepted to multiple schools.

For those preparing for Kellogg, I recommend speaking to students and get a gist of the culture. I definitely see the culture at Kellogg more collaborative and less competitive compared to other schools.

My story and why MBA?

It’s November 24, 2014, and I decided to take up blogging to describe my MBA application experience. The primary driver of starting this blog is to help other members of gmatclub.com, since I have used gmatclub pretty religiously during application season and preparing for the GMAT. You can find my name on gmatclub as JohnThunder.

Personal Background

I am an Asian-american male and part of the “over-represented minority.” I attended an ivy league for undergrad with an average GPA and worked in investment banking for a few years and currently at an investment management firm. I play basketball in my free-time and am involved with Chinatown community service. I also create stock pitches in my free time (yes this is nerdy) and analyze NBA game film (again pretty nerdy).

Why Business School?

Everyone wants to be their own boss and not want to work for the MAN. At my current firm, its structure is less of a meritocracy and more of an experience-based promotion model. When I was in investment banking, I was a maniac and got rewarded for it. At my current firm, it seems like it’s less about your work but more about how you look, what time you show up, how you present yourself with senior management, and etc. These “soft skills” I am really not the best at, and I barely have time to get through all my work and do not want to waste time schmoozing. Anyways, first goal of mine is to learn more about myself and receive real feedback to improve my leadership and management skills. Second, I want to do a startup. Third, I want to find a professor to be my mentor in the long-term.

So I knew about these goals a year before I applied to bschool. I think its important to start way ahead of time. I took Manhattan GMAT course, which costs ~$1,200, and thought it was a waste of money. Their offices suck, and the computer lab is from the 1990s. I did not see much score improvement from Manhattan, but when I started to do old GMAT problems from gmatclub.com, I saw an incredible increase in mainly verbal. I was specifically targeting 700+ questions which I would get wrong today. I probably could have scored higher the second time but in my first try I got a 730 in the winter 2013. Feel free to contact me for tips. I was a quant major so I didn’t work on the math section much and just focused on verbal.

Business Schools:

I applied to Harvard, Stanford, Wharton, MIT, Booth, and Kellogg. Yes, it’s pretty much all the top schools.

I was rejected at Harvard, and I have not heard back from Stanford. I assume Stanford is a DING!!!!! even though I spent the most amount of time on that application.

I interviewed at Wharton, Sloan, Booth, and Kellogg. I will describe the interview and how I applied in further detail in follow-up posts.

Please feel free to ask me any questions, and I will answer them all.